THE HANDSHAKE CEREMONY AFTER THE GAME

Question:
Gentlemen, has there ever been any instructions, memo, etc., on the procedure that the referees must follow in respect to what their duties are on monitoring the handshake process that the youth players and coaches do after the game is completed?USSF answer (March 30, 2007):
Here is what the Federation has to say on the matter, excerpted from the USSF publication “Advice to Referees on the Laws of the Game”:

5.2 REFEREE’S AUTHORITY
The referee’s authority begins upon arrival at the area of the field of play and continues until he or she has left the area of the field after the game has been completed. The referee’s authority extends to time when the ball is not in play, to temporary suspensions, to the half-time break, and to additional periods of play or kicks from the penalty mark required by the rules of the competition.

The custom of exchanging handshakes after the game is not universal practice. It is an invention of American youth soccer–and not even followed at all levels of American youth soccer. There is no accepted format.

Referees are instructed to leave the field quickly and quietly when the game has been completed. This is to avoid problems with coaches, parents, and players. If the handshake ceremony is a rule of the competition, then referees would likely have to remain behind to monitor it–but only if the rules of the competition explicitly require it.…

KICK-OFFS AT QUARTERS IN U6 OR U8?

Question:
When reffing an under 6 and under 8 match, who has the kickoff the 2nd and 4th quarter?USSF answer (March 22, 2007):
USYS rules are silent on the matter of a specific restart, noting only that (small-sided) teams at these ages play quarters of equal time, 8 minutes for U6 and 12 minutes for U8. Many leagues do not treat the quarter as equivalent to a half i.e., there is no specific restart because the instructions are simply to stop play (or use a convenient existing stoppage) near the quarter time mark. If the referee stopped play, the restart would be a dropped ball, otherwise it would be based on whatever else stopped play.

If you wish a definitive answer, you might check with the competition in which you play or officiate.…